Tasting noodle soup – the “soul” of Hanoi cuisine (Part 2)

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Your trip in Hanoi won’t be completed without tasting delicious noodle soup (Phở). Here are the next noodle soups you should try in the Vietnam’s capital city.

>>Tasting noodle soup – the “soul” of Hanoi cuisine (Part 1)

Bun Moc

Similar to bún thang, bún mọc is rice vemicelli served in chicken or pork broth. What is so special about this dish is that it comprises several different types of Vietnamese ham and sausages. One of the best places to have bún mọc is in Nam Ngư street. This little quiet street is a great getaway from the hustle and bustle of Hanoi and you can also find some other decent restaurants here.

Address: 70 Nam Ngu, Hanoi, Vietnam

Bun Moc (via Bách khoa toàn thư mở)

Bun Oc

Like the French, the Vietnamese eat snails too, but not the same kind of snails. They eat ốc (Vietnamese freshwater snails), which are smaller and chewier than the normal ones. Cooked snails are arranged neatly in a bowl of bún (rice vermicelli), fried tofu and fresh herbs. The dish is finished with a hot, sweet and sour broth that is poured over all of the cold ingredients. Finally, a few slices of cooked tomatoes are placed on top. One of the oldest places serving bún ốc is in Hàng Chai. Sometimes when it is too busy, guests have to hold their bowls in their hands because there are not enough tables. Still, it is a fun experience if you want to eat like a local.

Address: 6 Hang Chai, Hanoi, Vietnam

Bun Rieu

Bún (rice vermicelli) complements shellfish wonderfully — it is eaten with both ốc (freshwater snails), and riêu (minced freshwater mini crabs). Similar to bún ốc, bún riêu is served with fried tofu and sometimes, even thinly sliced beef fillets. The favourite place to have bún riêu for local students is in Hoè Nhai street. Although portions may be smaller than other riêu spots, the prices here are unbeatable.

Address: 13 Hoe Nhai, Hanoi, Vietnam

Bun Rieu (via bau.vn)

Pho Bo Sot Vang

Phở cay (Spicy pho) is a modern variation of traditional beef pho. Instead of being cooked in beef broth, beef in this dish is stewed in red wine and tomato sauce. The dish has a distinctive spicy flavor and vinegary taste, and is perhaps a little bit Westernized. Phở cay can be enjoyed in the Hanoi Tropical Café, which has very good ambiance and a comfortable, modern interior.

Address: 2C Quang Trung, Hanoi, Vietnam

Mien Ngan

Northern Vietnamese have certain rules for what food pairs best together. Bún tend to go with poultry and shellfish, while phở is usually eaten with either beef or chicken. Miến (cellophane noodles) can go with either freshwater eels or poultry such as ngan (creole duck), and Miến ngan is creole duck cellophane noodle soup. The combination of creole duck and bamboo shoots in this dish is a perfect marriage. Served from 10am to 2pm, miến ngan at 31 Lý Quốc Sư street is highly recommended by locals.

Address: 31 Ly Quoc Su, Hanoi

Mien Ngan (via Phununews.vn)

Bun Ca

If you do not want to start your day with meat or seafood, a lighter choice is always available. Originating from Hai Phong, a port city in northern Vietnam, bún cá is freshwater fish vermicelli soup, which is served with deep fried fish pieces for a crunchy touch. For a chewy taste, fried fish cakes can be added, and the dish is topped with spring onions and dill. A local favourite place to eat bún cá is in Hồng Phúc lane.”

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